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Injection Molding Conference Agenda

 

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

7:45 am

Registration & Continental Breakfast/Visit Exhibits

8:15 am

Welcome and Program Overview

 

Session A

9:00 am

Trevor Spika, Spiral Logic,  Dynamic Uni-Layer Melting Model – A Revolutionary Advancement in Plastics Processing Technology

9:35 am

Michael Hansen, Mack Molding, External Gas-Assist Injection Molding Applications

10:10 am

Networking Break/Visit Exhibits

10:40 am

Glenn Frohring, Absolute Haitian,  Energy Efficient Machine Solutions

11:15 am

Art Schubert, RJG, Blending Simulation with Scientific Molding

11:50 am

John Beaumont, BTI,  New Method for Characterizing the Injection Moldability of Plastic Materials and Mold Filling Analysis Verification

 

Session B

9:00 am

Joachim Kragl, Engel,  Organomelt & In-Situ Polymerization Offer New Opportunities for Injection Molded Composite Structures

9:35 am

Eric Bishop, Shin-Etsu,  Multi-Component Molding of LSR over Thermoplastics

10:10 am

Networking Break/Visit Exhibits

10:40 am

Brodie Delemeester, Incoe,  New Technology Minimizes or Eliminates Blemishes and Weld Lines in Sequential Molding

11:15 am

Rick Ortwein, LindeCO2 for Mold Hot Spots – It’s Really Cool!

11:50 am

Paul Boettger, Technoject Machinery,  New Advancements in Applying Hot Runner Technologies Effectively to Challenging Medical Molding Applications

12:20 pm

Lunch & Visit Exhibits

2:00 pm

Tutorials:

 

Brad Johnson, Penn State Behrend, Process Set-Up & Documentation

 

John Beaumont, Penn State Behrend, Reducing Lead-Times using a Systematic Mold Qualification Method

 

Jason Williams, Penn State Behrend, Integrated Product Development

 

Gary Smith, Penn State Behrend, Material Selection Overview

 

Ken Bush & Bob Koch, Boy Machines, Micro Molding Technology

5:00 – 7:00 pm

Networking Reception

 

Thursday, May 23, 2013

7:45 am

Registration & Continental Breakfast /Exhibits

8:15 am

Keynote:  Mark Proud, The Proud Company, Meet Rethink Robotics’ Baxter and See What He Can Do

 

Session A

9:30 am

 

Per Flem, Recto Molded Products, “We are Green Because it Saves Money, Period!”

10:05 am

 

Shawn Gross, Viking Plastics, Implementing Lean in a Molding Shop:  FUNdamental

10:40 am

 

Bill Egert, Logic One Robots,  Lean Automation – Finding Value, Cutting Waste & Perfecting Process with Simple Robotics

11:15 am

David Preusse, Wittmann Battenfeld, Molders Using Web-Based IT Systems to Improve Productivity

11:50 am

Matt Jaworski, Autodesk, Optimizing Mold Cooling with Simulation

 

Session B

9:30 am

 

John Ward, Arburg,  Considerations for LSR Cleanroom Molding

10:05 am

 

Susan E. Montgomery, PRIAMUS System Technologies & Brint Kipe, Kipe Mold, LSR Cold Runner Fill Imbalance Challenges and Solutions

10:40 am

 

Rick Finnie, M. R. Mold & Engineering, Product and Mold Design Considerations to Automate Your Next Silicone Project

11:15 am

Vince Colarossi, Momentive, New Molding Technology with UV Curing of Liquid Silicone Rubber for Low Temperature Processing

11:50 am

Bob Hendricks, Kistler, Make Your Mold Insert Changes Without Removing Your Cavity Pressure Sensors

12:20 pm

Lunch & Visit Exhibits

1:45 pm

Tutorials:

 

Brian Young, Penn State Behrend, Injection Molding Troubleshooting

 

Michael Zemo, Mettler-Toledo, Application of DMA and other Thermal Analysis Techniques

 

Brent Strawbridge & Levi Kishbaugh, Trexel, Introduction to MuCell

 

Bob Pelletier, Fluid Automation, Liquid Silicone Rubber Molding Overview

 

Jon Meckley, Penn State Behrend, Application of Mold Filling Analysis

 

Presentation Abstracts

Keynote:

Mark Proud of The Proud Company will share insights and a demonstration of Rethink Robotics’ ground-breaking Robot, Baxter.  Led by one of the world’s leading roboticists, Rodney Brooks, Rethink Robotics is working to change the way manufacturers see and use robots.  Baxter is the first in a new category of industrial robots that anyone can afford and anyone can train.  Designed to use common sense and work safely alongside people, Baxter is leading the way for a new class of revolutionary industrial robots.

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Half-hour presentations:

Trevor Spika, Spiral Logic, Dynamic Uni-Layer Melting Model – A Revolutionary Advancement in Plastics Processing Technology

Traditional screw design theory is based on formation of a solid-bed of resin between the screw flights. Melting the solid bed is primarily accomplished by shear heating in the screw compression zone. However, there are several problems related to controlling this melting method. The research here will show how removing the screw compression zone and preventing solid bed formation allows for; 1) eliminating melt over-heating from shear heating, 2) improving melting efficiency, 3) increasing melt stability, and 4) reducing material residence time. This melting model has been applied to a wide range of plastic materials and has been implemented in both injection molding and extrusion.

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Glenn Frohring, Absolute Haitian,  Energy Efficient Machine Solutions

This presentation will speak  to the importance of remaining competitive in the Global market with a focus on taking the strategy of implementing energy efficient injection molding Servo driven technology both for new and replacement machine requirements.    Glenn will explain servo technology, its developments and also cite real field energy savings and data.

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Matt Jaworski, Autodesk, Optimizing Mold Cooling with Simulation

Detailed analysis of mold designs is becoming increasingly necessary as advanced mold technologies are adopted.  Although cycle time, cooling and related warpage issues are critical factors in the injection molding process, many times cooling is left for the end of the mold design process and placed where you can fit it in. Conformal mold cooling is a cooling technique that aims to offer optimal cooling conditions exactly where you need them. The technology has been around for many years, but has become a real option now with the better and cheaper ways to manufacture conformal cooling cores. With the Cool (FEM) functionality inside Autodesk Simulation Moldflow software coupled with Autodesk® Simulation CFD software, you now have the capability to model even the most complicated conformal geometries and hot runners in full three-dimensional detail of all components. This process enables you to evaluate and optimize the hot runner and conformal cooling design to achieve an optimal mold design and injection molding process.

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Art Schubert, RJG, Blending Simulation with Scientific Molding

Once upon a time a molder built a tool to run a thin-wall packaging part. The simulation predicted good fill and packing. But the machine could not go fast enough. Having to slow down created air traps, flow lines; a general ugliness. What to do? Get a bigger barrel. Now the machine ran out of pressure to fill. Finally they got a machine that had pressure and flow. But the process tech slowed down the process because he didn’t like the sound of the hydraulics. And the defects returned.

Is this what caused an RJG student to say, “Simulation? Yeah, it poops out something. But we never use it.” †

We hope you can use some of the ideas in this presentation to connect simulation to “Scientific Molding” and avoid some of these problems.

( The original quote was rather more … colorful. )

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John Beaumont, BTI,  New Method for Characterizing the Injection Moldability of Plastic Materials and Mold Filling Analysis Verification

A new method for characterizing and mapping the injection moldability of plastic materials has been developed which is focused on providing practical and meaningful information to the plastics industry. Unlike today's standard extrusion based MFR tests and capillary rheometers, the new method evaluates the impact of mold temperature, injection rate and mold geometry on material flow though injection molds. Up to 140 different variations in process and geometry are used to map a material's injection moldability and then compiled into a simple format that can be used in product development, tool design, material selection, processing, new polymer development and injection molding simulation verifications.

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Joachim Kragl, Engel,  Organomelt & In-Situ Polymerization Offer New Opportunities for Injection Molded Composite Structures

The presentation describes Engels Organomelt process which combines forming of continuous fiber reinforced sheets or plaques with the injection molding process in a single molding cell. The process allows the high volume production of composite parts in a very cost effective way with a faster cycle time than with any other composite manufacturing methods. Parts will be trimmed besides the machine after the molding process to leave the manufacturing cell as a net shape part, ready to be assembled. The second process introduced is in situ polymerization of monomers in an injection mold processed with a "close to standard" injection molding machine. The composite fiber reinforcement is placed into the mold and then "overmolded" with the monomers to create a composite structure in a single production step. The low viscosity of the monomers allows for unprecedented design and process opportunities with this technology.

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Eric Bishop, Shin-Etsu,  Multi-Component Molding of LSR over Thermoplastics

Innovations in LSR chemistry allow for 2-shot and insert overmolding of silicone on a variety of engineering thermoplastics, including polycarbonate, without the use of primers or pre-treatment.  The streamlined process is more robust, efficient, and allows for design enhancements.  The silicone chemically bonds to the substrate in the mold yielding 100% cohesive failure in pull-testing.  Products are compliant with USP Class VI and ISO 10993 standards for biocompatibility and are available in a wide range of hardnesses to fit numerous applications.

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Brodie Delemeester, Incoe,  New Technology Minimizes or Eliminates Blemishes and Weld Lines in Sequential Molding

The technique of using hot runner valve-gates to sequentially deliver the melt to the cavity is a standard industry practice. Sequential valve-gating reduces the otherwise flow front collisions between a set of nozzles and moves the "knit line" to the end of the part or to a more suitable location on the part. However, there still exist applications using proper sequential molding practices where "unexplained" flow marks occur on the part. This flow mark can occur between a set of nozzles and/or near the gate itself that the molder is unable to reduce.

The material flow hesitation mark can be created by the very sudden drop of pressure as the melt is introduced into the cavity at an initial high rate of velocity as the sequence of valve-gated nozzles actuate. The material "blasts" into the cavity and, in essence, backfilling and jetting within the part with the quick opening of the next valve-gate pin.

Incoe Corporation® has developed new technology that allows the processor to precisely control the valve-gate pin opening time from the full closed position to the open position. This new technology enables gradual and controlled flow of plastic into the cavity at each gate. The reduced pressure peaks during the valve-gate opening result in reducing or eliminating the negative effects of blemishes and weld lines associated with traditional sequential injection molding. Clearly the current market environment requires that surface aesthetics of sequentially valve-gated parts be of the highest quality and this new technology delivers.

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Rick Ortwein, Linde,  CO2 for Mold Hot Spots – It’s Really Cool!

In the injection molding process, water cooling reaches its limits where the space for cooling channel bores is restricted. Liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) can be used in addition to the existing water temperature control system for effective localized cooling of hot spots in molded parts. Properly applied, this technology can produce dramatically shorter cycle times, improved quality, and lower cost.

The presentation describes a technology for spot cooling of the hard-to-reach hot spots of the injection mold.  The technology uses liquid carbon dioxide (CO2) for effective cooling of hot mold parts and is used in addition to the existing water temperature control system.  The system uses special CO2 solenoid valves to time the injection of CO2 through stainless steel capillary tubes inserted into small chambers in the metal of the mold. The chambers may be either drilled into the mold itself or they may be formed by hollow core pins

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Paul Boettger, Technoject Machinery,  New Advancements in Applying Hot Runner Technologies Effectively to Challenging Medical Molding Applications

The production of small size engineered plastic parts for the medical industry requires quality and process reliability as well as high output rates. This calls for hot runner technologies with individually controlled nozzles for close cavity spacing, systems with direct edge gating and clean room suitable actuations for valve gate systems.  Miniaturization of hot runner nozzles is opening up new ways to cost effectively ramp up to higher cavitation without increasing mold sizes and cavity spacings, which is a critical factor for thermally sensitive resins.  This talk discusses how the challenges of molding small size medical parts with hot runner systems are overcome with new nozzle designs as well as thermal management and new activation methods. These developments are very valuable for any medical molder looking to utilize hot runner technologies in new and more productive ways.

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Per Flem, Recto Molded Products, “We are Green because it Saves Money, Period!

This presentation is based upon Recto Molded Products’ journey in cutting our electric costs in half, over an 8 year period. At the beginning of this journey they had 45 old presses (scrapped all but 11), an old leaky cooling tower, and 160HP of air cooled chillers to "help" the leaky old cooling tower. In addition to cutting electricity costs, the natural gas costs were cut by 80% within one year at a cost of $500 to save $18,000/year.

Every molding facility has its own circumstances depending upon number/size/technology of molding machines, the kind of components being manufactured and the facility being used.  For that reason everyone looks at energy consumption differently. The common denominator is that no one has produced a molding machine that doesn't use electricity, and that we all believe electric rates will only go up.

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Shawn Gross, Viking Plastics,  Implementing lean in a molding shop:  fundamental

As many molders are experiencing a rapid return from the dark days of 2008, they also are seeking out ways to improve operational performance.  The drumbeat of turning increased revenue into more profit, while developing an engaged workforce, is never ending.  Many techniques are employed and fail, but Viking Plastics has settled on a simple, fun, and effective method called 2 Second Lean.  Viking discovered 2S Lean in the summer of 2011 and initiated the concepts with its warehouse operation and expanded this to the entire operation in 2012.  This presentation will examine the concepts and applications so a company can consider it for building a fun, engaged culture of people who improve their work every day!

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Bill Egert, Logic One Robots,   Lean Automation – Finding Value, Cutting Waste & Perfecting Process with Simple Robotics

With continuing economic difficulties, plastics molders are looking at Lean Automation to improve their molding process. Lean manufacturers excel at identifying process value important to their customers, cutting process waste and improving process efficiency.  Lean manufacturing involves a few aspects that may be new to injection molders: 1) your customer's values define process perfection; 2) process perfection maximizes customer satisfaction; and 3) Jidoka (built-in quality) is obtained via continuous flow, open systems & industry standards.

With the current economic trends, plastics molders are looking for cost-effective ways to deploy robots. Smart plastic molders use simple robot designs, via simple PLC controls. The result is automation that follows the lead of your workers, rather than stressing them with overly complicated problems. Besides more customer focus, smoother operations and better efficiency, lean molding provides cost savings from a practical approach to automation.

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David Preusse, Wittmann Battenfeld, Molders Using Web-Based IT Systems to Improve Productivity

To compete in today’s economy, process engineers and technicians are being forced to do more with less maintenance staff and other in-plant support.  Web-Services technology is being realized today by many molding companies to enhance their molding operations performance, create uptime, and obtain supplier support in shorter time for very low cost.  Web based service is being used today individually or collectively in these equipment components of a molding plant:

  • Injection Molding Machines
  • Central Water Systems
  • Central Material Handling Systems
  • Robots & Automation Cells

The interconnectivity between these items and smaller auxiliaries such as temperature controllers, dryers, loaders, blenders, granulators, hot runner controls, and more will continue to give advanced molders a greater chance to compete, here in the USA.  This talk will discuss both current practice and the future of this web based technology.

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Michael Hansen, Mack Molding, External Gas-Assist Injection Molding Applications

While external gas-assisted (EGA) injection molding has been around for some time, it has only recently burst onto the scene as the ‘next generation’ molding technique for large parts. Why? It has been proven to cut costs, lower tonnage requirements, minimize warpage, improve overall part quality, and reduce or even eliminate secondary operations. Consequently, it is now being used in more and more applications, including medical devices.
As a custom medical molder and contract manufacturer, it is imperative to not only help your customer select the appropriate manufacturing process, but to also determine early on whether the selected process/resin combination is suitable to accomplish all the other application requirements prior to building a production tool.

The presentation will discuss the advantages and benefits of EGA, review the process sequence and how it compares to internal gas-assisted injection molding, and highlight the inroads the process is making into medical and industrial device applications.
The presentation will also discuss the evaluation criteria from a molding and process point of view for EGA parts. These criteria form the basis for a successful external gas application. Finally, examples of real-life applications molded in various resins will be analyzed based on tonnage reduction, rib structure and unpainted finished cosmetic surface.

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John Ward, Arburg,  Considerations for LSR Cleanroom Molding

If you wish to use the many opportunities now offered by clean room technology in your company, you need to be able to rely on a partner who can offer you all the necessary technical components. The manufacture of innovative LSR technical medical items, technical applications in the automotive, optical or micro-electronics sectors show that a wide range of options is available for high-quality clean production. 

  • Application - specific:
            - Required clean room conditions and standards 
  • Precisely tailored modular machine technology;

   -Clean room options

  • Multi-faceted clean room concepts
  • Automation and parts handling
  • Application examples

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Susan E. Montgomery, PRIAMUS System Technologies & Brint Kipe, Kipe Molds ,  LSR Cold Runner Fill Imbalance Challenges and Solutions

A great deal of speculation  exists in the sphere of silicone molders and mold makers regarding what is really happening with silicone viscosity and flow in the mold cavity.  Data from a four cavity LSR development mold will be presented to provide better or more informed explanations for the observations seen in silicone molding.  The test results quantify characteristics of silicone viscosity, flow patterns, temperatures and pressures within mold cavities. 

Different LSR materials were evaluated under varied process conditions for injection speed, vacuum and cavity temperature. The changes in these parameters and the effects on mold filling and material viscosity will be shown.

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Rick Finnie, M. R. Mold & Engineering,  Product and Mold Design Considerations to Automate Your Next Silicone Project

Silicone is a material that can be forgiving in design to mold, but yet demanding to de-mold. Features that are unacceptable in thermoplastics are feasible with silicone. A method of assuring where the parts will stay is imperative. Product design and the mold design have to encompass these issues to enable automation. It is occasionally difficult to predict which side of the mold the silicone will stick to. Automation needs to be designed to remove the part from the mold using techniques that are not typical in thermoplastic. Silicone can be de-molded from features where thermoplastics would be destroyed.

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Vince Colarossi, Momentive,  New Molding Technology with UV Curing of Liquid Silicone Rubber for Low Temperature Processing

UV cure silicone rubber belongs to a new class of rubber that offers high cure speed at low temperatures.  UV light initiates crosslinking through a photochemical reaction, not heat.  The rubber can be processed via injection molding with special molds or via extrusion without additional heat cure.  This UV cure technology offers the possibility to produce parts and combinations that were previously difficult to manufacture, since heat curing processes limit the use of temperature sensitive ingredients.  And, this new technology saves energy.

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Bob Hendricks, Kistler, Make your mold insert changes without removing your cavity pressure sensors

These elements for installing Kistler single-wire sensors in molds with mold inserts or exchangeable modules offer the following advantages:

• Mold inserts change without dismounting sensor

• Connector for 1 or 4 sensors

• Prevents cable damage during mold servicing

Product Description

Single-channel system Type 1712A0 consists of two elements allowing connection of any Kistler single-wire sensor between a mold insert and its frame or mold plate. Four-channel contact element Type 1714A0 allows connection of up to four sensors at the same time. The two contact elements are guided to ensure reliable charge transfer. The single-wire cables have crimped contacts and can be removed.

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Three-hour tutorials:

 

Brad Johnson, Penn State Behrend, Process Set-Up & Documentation

Go through a hands-on process set-up using a proven methodology for setting up an injection molding process on a closed-loop controlled machine. The two stages of this method refer to the injection portion of the set-up, with the first stage controlled by velocity and the second stage controlled by pressure. During this tutorial you will be walked through the steps of the set-up, learn what types of problems to look for along the way, and why the various process settings are made.

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John Beaumont, Penn State Behrend, & Dave Hoffman, Beaumont Technologies, Reducing Lead-Times using a Systematic Mold Qualification Method

Mold qualification is a daunting task even for the seasoned veteran, partly due to all the "noise" seen during mold startup. This noise makes it difficult to separate out root causes of variations in the process, mold, and part quality data. This workshop will provide attendees with an understanding of fundamental plastic flow principles and teach them how material property variations are occurring naturally within their molds and affecting their mold qualification time. Attendees will then use this understanding to assign “Flow Groups” and “Regions” to any given mold layout so that they can apply root cause analysis to their data (i.e. mold balance analysis, mold maintenance, or part quality). The overall goal of this tutorial is to help attendees learn how to reduce mold lead-times by giving them a systematic approach for isolating the root causes of variations by separating “steel” from “shear-induced” material property variations. Attendees will work with the 5 Step ProcessTM software (from Beaumont) as part of this tutorial.

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Jason Williams, Penn State Behrend, Integrated Product Development

Product development is no longer a modular, linear process. Current trends in product lifecycle demand a rapid, team-based approach to create dynamic products. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of this integrated approach to product development and provide an outline they can apply to their own development processes.

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Gary Smith, Penn State Behrend, Material Selection Overview

Basic polymer fundamentals will be introduced with a strong correlation to structure property relationships. An overview will be given of homopolymers, copolymers, morphology, molecular weight, and viscosity. Structure property relationships based on polymer chemistry (in a non-intimidating way!) will focus on “why” the materials perform like they do. Polymer fundamentals will be incorporated into a product selection process and failure analysis.

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Ken Bush & Bob Koch, Boy Machines, Micro Molding Technology

A demonstration will be given on a 11-ton BOY XS injection molding machine and discuss the subject of Micro Molding Technology including the blending of precision tool building, processing, innovation, and the sprueless molding concept.  The BOY XS will process a single-cavity idle clip with a living hinge using the sprueless method of injecting directly into the cavity.  The tool was built and is provided by Pleasant Precision located in Kenton, Ohio.

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Brian Young, Penn State Behrend, Injection Molding Troubleshooting

This tutorial will provide hands-on experience in solving common molding problems in the processing lab. In the classroom, the theory behind the solutions and problem-solving strategies will be discussed.

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Michael Zemo, Mettler-Toledo, Application of DMA and other Thermal Analysis Techniques

Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) data makes it possible for engineers and designers to understand the important aspects of a plastic material’s behavior over an extended service life.  See the how data is generated and learn about practical applications.  In addition, a number of other thermal analysis techniques will be reviewed.

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Brent Strawbridge & Levi Kishbaugh, Trexel,  Introduction to MuCell

The MuCell process for producing microcellular injection molded parts is accepted as a technology for providing a more dimensionally stable part through a reduction in residual stress with increased productivity over compact molded parts.  However, parts designed for solid injection molding will always be limited in the benefits achieved with microcellular foaming due to industry accepted design constraints resulting from the solid molding process.

A much larger improvement in productivity can be realized by designing parts to take advantage of the unique process enhancements provided by the MuCell process.  This tutorialpaper will discuss the basics of foaming, the MuCell process and design freedom that can be realized through microcellular foaming.  A demonstration of the process will also be carried out in Penn State’s processing lab.

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Bob Pelletier, Fluid Automation, Liquid Silicone Rubber Molding Overview

You should be prepared to get your hands dirty (or sticky) as this tutorial will involve making parts on our all-electric liquid silicone rubber (LSR) molding machine. See how the LSR process differs from conventional thermoplastics molding. The steps of a process set-up will be reviewed, as well as some of the features of the LSR feeding and molding equipment.

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Jon Meckley, Penn State Behrend,  Application of Mold Filling Analysis

This workshop shows the advantages of using mold-filling analysis during the design phase to reduce potential problems and create a more robust design. There will be demonstrations of the use of the software and the methodologies used to solve problems.  How to interpret the results of the simulation will also be discussed.

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